wida_90pxWine Industry Transformation
WIDA ready to address wine industry transformation.

 


Transformation of the wine industry can only be achieved if sustainable new ownership is encouraged and supported, poverty alleviation is pro-actively addressed and if skills development is embarked upon as a critical imperative.
This was said by Willie Williams, chairperson of the Wine Industry Development Association (WIDA), in his address at the organisation’s official launch at the Santam regional head office in Bellville.

Williams emphasised that “less than one percent of the South Africa’s wine industry is currently black owned, an indication that transformation in this sector remains long overdue. Transfer of ownership and access to opportunities for HDI’s in this sector is moving at an alarmingly slow pace”.

“The wine industry provides significant economic, employment and development opportunities in production, trade, exports and tourism – the role of government as a partner to industry is vital to facilitate and support the wine industry on its growth and developmental path.

“Less than one percent of the South Africa’s wine industry is currently black owned, an indication that transformation in this sector remains long overdue.” – Willy Williams
“Successful transformation of the Wine Industry depends upon mutual respect and co-operation of all parties involved – the industry itself, government institutions at national, provincial and local level, the private sector, organised la­­bour and civil society.”

He said that WIDA, on behalf of the wine Industry, undertook to co-operate with the relevant institutions in order to improve the quality of life of farm workers and their families, as the most vulnerable community in the wine industry.

WIDA supported the government land reform targets and emphasised the necessity for productive co-operation between all parties involved in this process.

“The SA wine industry will have to take active responsibility for and support economic and social transformation in the industry. WIDA will present social responsibility programmes throughout the value chain and thus give credence by:

  • Empowering farm workers to access government support programmes
  • Creating and supporting stable community structures
  • Reducing vulnerability of the marginalised
  • Empowering the youth to ensure that they are well adjusted, healthy and contributing to society in a positive manner
  • Promoting the interests of women in an industry that is male dominated

“The SA wine Industry should recognise that broad-based change and social development are essential to move forward to a deracialised industry, while at the same time remaining committed to sustainability and International competitiveness.

“Through WIDA historically disadvantaged groups will be enabled to create economic ownership; to gain access to assets, and exploit business opportunities along the full value chain in the industry. We will ensure that all role players’ in particular historically disadvantaged groups and individuals are empowered to make a constructive contribution to the industry and country at large. We will address backlogs in the supply of skilled workers and create opportunities for HDI’s to participate in a productive and sustainable manner,” Williams added

The executive director of WIDA , Denver Williams, said since its initial inception in 2006, the unit had taken time to develop capacity, strategy and an operational framework.

“This is to ensure that its work is successfully focused on four pillars: social development by addressing the needs of vulnerable communities, people development through skills development and training, economic support and broad-based empowerment, and industrial relations to improve the working conditions of farm workers.”

Based in Paarl, WIDA will deploy a range of support mechanisms and tactics, including bursaries for wine-related studies, workshops, and providing information on housing rights

The launch also featured the wines of up-and-coming winemakers, three of whom are women-owned: Kholisa Wines, Seven Sisters, Libby’s Pride Wines, M’hudi and Yammé.

Meanwhile, the head of Santam Agriculture, Dr Tobias Doyer, said in a press release that hosting WIDA’s launch “offered the Santam Agriculture business unit the opportunity to associate their business with the efforts at development and transformation that are necessary to continue the leadership of the industry on the global stage.”

Transformation of the wine industry can only be achieved if sustainable new ownership is encouraged and supported, poverty alleviation is pro-actively addressed and if skills development is embarked upon as a critical imperative.

This was said by Willie Williams, chairperson of the Wine Industry Development Association (Wida), in his address at the organisation’s official launch at the Santam regional head office in Bellville.

Williams emphasised that “less than one percent of the South Africa’s wine industry is currently black owned, an indication that transformation in this sector remains long overdue. Transfer of ownership and access to opportunities for HDI’s in this sector is moving at an alarmingly slow pace”.

“The wine industry provides significant economic, employment and development opportunities in production, trade, exports and tourism – the role of government as a partner to industry is vital to facilitate and support the wine industry on its growth and developmental path.

“Less than one percent of the South Africa’s wine industry is currently black owned, an indication that transformation in this sector remains long overdue.” – Willy Williams

“Successful transformation of the Wine Industry depends upon mutual respect and co-operation of all parties involved – the industry itself, government institutions at national, provincial and local level, the private sector, organised la­­bour and civil society.”

He said that Wida, on behalf of the wine Industry, undertook to co-operate with the relevant institutions in order to improve the quality of life of farm workers and their families, as the most vulnerable community in the wine industry.

Wida supported the government land reform targets and emphasised the necessity for productive co-operation between all parties involved in this process.

“The SA wine industry will have to take active responsibility for and support economic and social transformation in the industry. Wida will present social responsibility programmes throughout the value chain and thus give credence by:

* Empowering farm workers to access government support programmes

* Creating and supporting stable community structures

* Reducing vulnerability of the marginalised

* Empowering the youth to ensure that they are well adjusted, healthy and contributing to society in a positive manner

* Promoting the interests of women in an industry that is male dominated

“The SA wine Industry should recognise that broad-based change and social development are essential to move forward to a deracialised industry, while at the same time remaining committed to sustainability and International competitiveness.

“Through Wida historically disadvantaged groups will be enabled to create economic ownership; to gain access to assets, and exploit business opportunities along the full value chain in the industry. We will ensure that all role players’ in particular historically disadvantaged groups and individuals are empowered to make a constructive contribution to the industry and country at large. We will address backlogs in the supply of skilled workers and create opportunities for HDI’s to participate in a productive and sustainable manner,” Williams added

The executive director of Wida, Denver Williams, said since its initial inception in 2006, the unit had taken time to develop capacity, strategy and an operational framework.

“This is to ensure that its work is successfully focused on four pillars: social development by addressing the needs of vulnerable communities, people development through skills development and training, economic support and broad-based empowerment, and industrial relations to improve the working conditions of farm workers.”

Based in Paarl, Wida will deploy a range of support mechanisms and tactics, including bursaries for wine-related studies, workshops, and providing information on housing rights

The launch also featured the wines of up-and-coming winemakers, three of whom are women-owned: Kholisa Wines, Seven Sisters, Libby’s Pride Wines, M’hudi and Yammé.

Meanwhile, the head of Santam Agriculture, Dr Tobias Doyer, said in a press release that hosting Wida’s launch “offered the Santam Agriculture business unit the opportunity to associate their business with the efforts at development and transformation that are necessary to continue the leadership of the industry on the global stage.”